Not content to redefine consent to mean asking permission before every step of the sexual process, California is now on the path to teaching high school students the proper way to have sex — because human nature is now wrong.

To recap: Last year California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a law aiming to redefine consent as an "affirmative, conscious, and voluntary agreement," that is "ongoing throughout a sexual activity and can be revoked at any time." Saying "no" to unwanted sexual contact was no longer necessary, as a "lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent, nor does silence mean consent." Also, previous sexual history "should never by itself be assumed to be an indicator of consent." Alcohol also negates consent, since the line between "intoxicated" and "incapacitated" can be decided after the fact by an accuser.

This means that every time two college students have sex they have to act like they've never met before and ask for approval for everything from the first kiss and touch through intercourse. I tried multiple times to ask the sponsor of the California bill, State Sen. Kevin de Leon, how someone could prove they obtained consent under his law, but only received press releases and quoted paragraphs from the bill. When asked to clarify how one would prove they had obtained consent, his spokeswoman didn't respond.

The "yes means yes" law effectively defines every sexual encounter as rape unless you follow the law's specific requirements — or unless neither party turns the other in to police.

Now de Leon is moving on to round two: Teaching high school students the "correct" way to have sex. Human nature is no longer the correct way. De Leon knows the correct way — and it involves a lot of questions.

The California state senate just passed S.B. 695, which adds affirmative consent instruction to high school health courses. The bill passed by a vote of 39-0 and had bipartisan support.

"As it stands, we are not doing nearly enough. We can and must educate the youth of our state, especially our young men, about affirmative consent and healthy relationships," de Leon said in a press release about the new bill. "This bill represents the next step in the fight to change behavior toward young women."

This is an example of using the law to change human behavior: "Have sex this way or be labeled a rapist."

The bill now heads to the state assembly. Given that "yes means yes" passed through the legislature and was signed by the governor, I have no doubt that California students will soon be taught how to have government-approved sex.