As President Trump presses forward on his promise to “build the wall,” Berkeley’s City Council has approved the development of an ordinance that would forbid it from contracting with companies involved in the southern border wall's construction.

The move is part of a growing push in California’s most progressive cities to blacklist any company that might help Trump accomplish his national security agenda.

Earlier this month, the Oakland City Council unanimously passed a similar measure, and two of the country’s largest sanctuary cities, Los Angeles and San Francisco, floated related measures after Trump signed his executive order on the border wall.

While this pointless action is sure to have zero impact on the wall construction, Berkeley apparently could not tolerate the thought of other cities acting more liberal than itself.

In March, its city council approved a resolution that called on the city to vet existing and new contracts to avoid doing business with those who were involved in the project. The council subsequently revised the City’s Investment Policy to prohibit investment with companies “involved with designing, building or financing the construction of the border wall.”

Now, a new ordinance will establish a formal city policy to back up this resolution.

Prior to the council meeting, Berkeley requested input from residents in an online public forum called “Berkeley Considers.” By the time the forum closed Tuesday, the city had received 55 responses, with 72.7 percent of participants voting “yes” and 23.6 percent voting “no.”

Proponents of the proposal said the border is harmful to California’s economy and that the ordinance would protect the state’s prosperity. “[The action is] important because California is the most prosperous state in the nation because we believe in openness,” said Councilmember Ben Bartlett, who co-drafted the proposal. “We don’t subscribe in division.” [sic]

Of course, it wouldn’t be California if it didn’t involve climate change scare tactics. The agenda item noted that the border wall will “divide habitats, waterways, ancestral lands and communities, contributing to climate change,” even though there is no proof that any of those side effects actually lead to climate change.

With the approval of this action, the city manager has 90 days to develop an ordinance prohibiting companies involved in the construction of a border wall from contracting with the city of Berkeley. Once this is complete, the council will have to search for other new ways to challenge Trump’s agenda.

Brendan Pringle (@BrendanPringle) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. He is a freelance journalist in California.

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