CNN's White House correspondent is calling on his colleagues in the White House Press corps to unite in protest over cameras sometimes being barred from daily press briefings.

"I think at some point some collective action ... will have to be taken," Jim Acosta said Monday.

Acosta, who has frequently sparred with White House press secretary Sean Spicer, repeatedly shouted questions and was ignored during Moday's briefing. Spicer later admonished Acosta saying, "There's no camera on, Jim."

CNN host Don Lemon on Monday suggested that the White House press corps defy the White House and turn their cameras on anyway.

"You've got to stand up and got to take a stance. And I think if everybody turns the cameras on, and if everybody has each other's backs, they cannot do it, no way they can do it," Lemon said.

Veteran White House Correspondent and CNN contributor April Ryan cautioned against such moves and shot down calls for journalists to boycott the briefings.

"You know what, boycotting is not the answer. You won't get questions if we boycott. And if we boycott, we walk out, they shut the doors from us," Ryan said as she appeared with Acosta.

Acosta repeated his calls for the White House to allow cameras in the briefings because he feels it provides transparency.

"Are we going to allow it to be the new normal that we're not going to have the cameras on at the press briefings? Something a governor wouldn't do in a state," Acosta said Monday.

Ryan joined Acosta in his criticism of the White House, blasting Spicer for turning cameras off in the briefing room over fears that reporters are "grandstanding."

"I don't believe it's grandstanding. I believe it's asking questions, and sometimes he's not prepared when he comes to the podium, and he does not want to show he's not prepared," Ryan said.