A plan to reform immigration and grant amnesty to nearly 700,000 young adults that is being shopped by six senators would waive some criminal convictions, let 300 “sanctuary cities” off the hook and starve Immigration and Customs Enforcement of funds to track down and deport criminal illegals, according to a new analysis of the proposal.

“This proposal is not a serious effort to find common ground with either the majority of congressional Republicans or the president,” according to immigration expert Jessica M. Vaughan, director of policy studies for the Center for Immigration Studies.

“It pays only lip service to what is required to achieve the immigration policy improvements that Americans seek, and that they elected Donald Trump to accomplish,” she added in a new analysis released Friday.

She obtained the details of the plan and found several areas that clash with the basic wishes of the White House and promises made by Trump during the 2016 presidential campaign.

“Judging by details obtained by the Center, the aim is actually maximum amnesty, minimum border security and no cuts to legal immigration, and not a good faith effort to reach a deal with either the House of Representatives or the president,” wrote Vaughan.

You can see her full analysis here, but below are some of her key points:

  • Dreamer amnesty would allow waivers for certain criminal convictions that exist under current law, if deemed to be "in the public interest."
  • Applicants for the program would have to pay up on any federal tax liability, if they had a DACA work permit, but not if they worked illegally prior to legalization.
  • The proposal claims to restrict chain migration, by eliminating the category for adult sons and daughters of green card holders, which admits about 26,000 people a year. However, it transfers those numbers to another chain migration category for spouses of green card holders and their children. So there is no net decrease in chain migration at all under this proposal.
  • There is no funding for ICE or interior enforcement, no expansion of E-Verify, nor any provisions to address the broken asylum system, sanctuary cities, the continued influx of illegal families and minors from Central America, visa overstays, an entry-exit system, the backlogged immigration court, illegal employment, or any of the other needs compiled at the president's request prepared by career immigration agency officials.

Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com