One of the federal law enforcement officials that Congress regards as most responsible for Operation Fast and Furious received extended paid leave from his government job, which allows him to draw a second salary working at JP Morgan.

The paid leave also allows McMahon to get a larger pension when he finally, officially, leaves the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives.

“Given McMahon’s outsized role in the Fast and Furious scandal, the decision to approve an extended annual leave arrangement in order to attain pension eligibility and facilitate full-time, outside employment while still collecting a full-time salary at ATF raises a host of questions about both the propriety of the arrangement and the judgment of ATF management,” wrote Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, and Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., in a letter to ATF.

A congressional report into Operation Fast and Furious, the gun-walking scheme that ended with the death of a U.S. border patrol agent, “alleged that McMahon knew that no safeguards were in place to prevent a large number of guns from getting into Mexico, but he made no effort to stop them,” as The Washington Post explained.

McMahon apologized to Congress for his handling of Operation Fast and Furious. “Rather than imposing consequences for his admitted failures, the ATF appears to be rewarding McMahon,” the lawmakers wrote.