Former White House national security aide Sebastian Gorka wrote in an op-ed on Monday that he was urged to cooperate with Michael Wolff for his book about the Trump White House, though he ultimately declined to speak with the Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House author.

Decrying Wolff's tell-all book as a "politically-motivated publication," Gorka said he first encountered the author as he was waiting inside the West Wing to speak with then-White House chief strategist Steve Bannon.

"[W]hen I met Michael Wolff in Reince Priebus' office, where he was waiting to talk to Steve Bannon, and after I had been told to also speak to him for his book, my attitude was polite but firm: 'Thanks but no thanks,'" Gorka wrote in The Hill.

It was not immediately clear whether Priebus, then Trump's chief of staff, was the one who instructed Gorka to speak with Wolff. Doing so would contradict what other White House officials, including President Trump, have said about the level of access Wolff had to the president and his aides.

Reached by text message on Monday about his claim that someone in the White House requested his cooperation with the author, Gorka responded, "No comment."

A search for "Gorka" in Fire and Fury turns up only one mention, in which Wolff describes the former Trump aide as "the oddball White House foreign policy adviser."

Gorka's disdain for the media was well known during his tenure in the West Wing, during which time he popularized the phrase "fake news industrial complex" to describe the mainstream media.

Although his policy portfolio in the White House was unclear, viewers could frequently catch him on the cable news circuit defending the president and speaking about his area of expertise: terrorism.

Many viewed Gorka as a close Bannon ally given his time as a national security editor at Breitbart News under Bannon's leadership before he joined the administration.

A source close to the White House told the Washington Examiner on Friday that many of the current and former aides who spoke with Wolff believed they were not speaking on the record when they offered such candor to the author.

Several of those individuals, including former deputy chief of staff Katie Walsh, have simultaneously accused Wolff of fabricating quotes to insert in his book.