North Korea's surprise detonation of a low-yield H-bomb, dismissed as virtually irrelevant by some media experts, is exactly what others have been warning about: a potential Super-EMP weapon that could easily wipe out the electric grid, cars and electronics over a wide swath of the United States.

Once dismissed as Buck Rogers fantasy, concerns about electromagnetic pulse and the effect on the electric grid are being addressed in Congress due to a major concern that North Korea or Iran would explode an H-bomb like device over the U.S. It could easily be fired from a freight ship off the U.S. coast, they claim.

Expert, Dr. Peter Vincent Pry, who served on the former Commission to Assess the Threat to the United States from Electromagnetic Pulse Attack, told Secrets that the yield of the North Korean explosion is well within the requirements of a Super-EMP weapon.

"Neutron bombs or Enhanced Radiation Weapons such as Super-EMP weapons are essentially very low-yield H-Bombs, that typically have yields of 1-10 kilotons, just like the North Korean device," said Pry, executive director of the Task Force on National and Homeland Security.

"Thus, Kim Jong-Un could be telling the truth. Indeed, all four North Korean nuclear tests look like a Super-EMP weapon because of their very low yield. That the 'Dear Leader' describes the latest test as an H-Bomb is further evidence that North Korea's mysterious nuke is a Super-EMP warhead," added Pry.

Those bombs, he added, generate enhanced gamma rays, which is what causes the Super-EMP effect.

States governments and federal official have begun to take the threat of a Super-EMP attack seriously and the North Korean test could spur greater anxiety over how to protect the nation's electric grid. In June, the House Homeland Security Committee passed the "Critical Infrastructure Protection Act" that will explore ways to protect the grid.

Pry has warned that North Korea could deliver the bomb via ship or on a satellite. In fact, he recently said that North Korea practiced an EMP strike against the U.S. by orbiting a satellite at the correct altitude and trajectory to launch the attack.

Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com.