What happens when science, political correctness, and corporate America collide? The media has an uproar and one guy loses his job.

Recently a frustrated Google employee drafted a lengthy memo complaining about "Google's Ideological Echo Chamber" and argued that there are not as many women in technology industries not because of bias or sexual discrimination, but because of innate differences between men and women. The memo leaked and Google originally supported the employee saying he had a right to his own unique views. But now they've fired the poor but enlightened chap who happens to value science over political correctness.

Of course, Google's progressive political biases are no secret -- perhaps to everyone but Google. As Bloomberg reports, this isn't the first time the company has been in hot water over a gender debate. "The memo and surrounding debate comes as Google fends off a lawsuit from the U.S. Department of Labor alleging the company systemically discriminates against women. Google has denied the charges, arguing that it doesn't have a gender gap in pay, but has declined to share full salary information with the government. According to the company's most recent demographic report, 69 percent of its workforce and 80 percent of its technical staff are male.

Still the employee's brave manifesto of sorts, arguing that science is king over even what the world's most renowned tech-company believes about men, women, and work, wasn't all that outrageous, gutsy, and certainly not factually incorrect. He writes, "At Google, we're regularly told that implicit (unconscious) and explicit biases are holding women back in tech and leadership. Of course, men and women experience bias, tech, and the workplace differently and we should be cognizant of this, but it's far from the whole story. On average, men and women biologically differ in many ways."

Indeed, as if real life weren't proof positive enough, more and more research supports this factual assertion. This spring, Stanford Medicine released a study of major differences between the male and female brain which revealed while environment causes some differences, hard-wiring causes most of the major differences between how men and women think and act. This isn't politically biased or correct -- or even political at all. This is just biology. Google, of all companies, should not only understand this but at the least, be at peace with it. Consider, for example, how their ads target men and women differently.

Inside the now-fired employee's aptly-named "Ideological Echo Chamber," the myth lives on that men and women are basically the same, and even so Google employs more men than women, pays the men more based on education, accomplishments at Google, and how long they've worked there, and then claims bias is nonexistent. Meanwhile, the company feels it can justify firing an employee for pointing all of this out in an accurate, if rambling, memo.

What's most dangerous here is Google's determination to absolutely ignore, even eradicate, the role of science in work, personal relationships and politics. When everything must submit to the progressive whim of political correctness, society begins to lose its grip on everything from biology and freedom to workplace rights and common sense.

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