Rep. Adam Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee, said Wednesday evening that Donald Trump Jr. acknowledged having a discussion with his father regarding the controversial June 2016 meeting in Trump Tower after the emails regarding the meeting became public, but refused to say anything else on the matter.

Trump Jr. testified Wednesday to the House Intelligence Committee behind closed doors regarding an eight-person meeting that took place in June 2016 between the Trump campaign and Russian operatives.

"He acknowledged having discussed the June 9 meeting and the emails that went into establishing that meeting," Schiff, D-Calif., said on CNN following the eight-hour interview. "After those emails became public, he acknowledged discussing that matter with his father but refused to answer questions about that discussion on the basis of a claim of attorney-client privilege."

Schiff added: "In my view, there is no attorney client privilege that protects a discussion between father and son."

Rep. Eric Swalwell, another Democrat in the House intelligence panel backed Schiff's remarks, saying Trump Jr. refused to answer questions about conversations he had with his father.

"Mr. Schiff quite effectively asked many questions about that exchange. He claimed that his attorneys were present when he spoke with his father, so it was covered by an attorney-client privilege," Swalwell, D-Calif., said on MSNBC.

Schiff, a graduate of Harvard Law School, reiterated the House Intelligence Committee's need for further investigation into the "pivotal" meeting between the Trump campaign and Russians which was set up on the premise that there would be dirt to damage Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign.

Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, another member of the House intelligence panel, tweeted after the marathon interview that the investigation into Trump Jr. "is far from over."

Earlier reporters said Trump Jr. claimed that he did not directly speak with his father before knowledge of his June meeting at Trump Tower went public. Instead, he went to White House communications director Hope Hicks, who acted as a liaison between the president and his son while aboard Air Force One, according to CNN, citing multiple sources familiar with his testimony.