Sen. Lindsey Graham said Wednesday that Attorney General Jeff Sessions should recuse himself from any federal government investigation into the possible links between the Trump administration and Russia.

The South Carolina Republican also said there should be a special prosecutor if there is any evidence of something criminal.

"I don't know that there's anything between the Trump campaign and the Russians. I'm not going to base my decision based on newspaper articles," Graham said during a CNN townhall Wednesday night appearing alongside Sen. John McCain.

"If there is something there, and it goes up the chain of investigation, it is clear to me that Jeff Sessions, who is my dear friend, cannot make this decision about Trump."

A Washington Post story published Wednesday night revealed that Sessions — who was an adviser to now-President Trump during his campaign — spoke with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak in July and September. Sessions said under oath that he did not have any communications with "the Russians" during the campaign.

Graham added that though there "may be nothing, if there's something there, if the FBI believes is criminal in nature, then, for sure, you need a special prosecutor. If that day ever comes, I'll be the first one to say it needs to be somebody other than Jeff."

As attorney general, Sessions would oversee an investigation by both the Justice Department and FBI.

Sessions' spokeswoman Sarah Isgur Flores said in response to the Post report that there was nothing "misleading about his answer" to Congress because he "was asked during the hearing about communications between Russia and the Trump campaign — not about meetings he took as a senator and a member of the Armed Services Committee."

McCain didn't call for Sessions to recuse himself, but did criticize Trump over his approach to Russia.

"Have no doubt, what the Russians tried to do to our election could have destroyed democracy," the Arizona Republican said during the CNN townhall.

"And that's why we've got to pay a hell of a lot more attention to the Russians and the things they're doing in Europe — and right now, they're trying to determine the outcome of the French election, and they're using cyber."

McCain, who is chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, has called on a select committee to investigative Russia's attempts to interfere with the 2016 election.