The New York Times print story that said "wiretapped data" was being used to investigate President Trump's associates is being presented differently online, with a headline that downplays the idea that any information came from a wiretap.

The difference was noted on Twitter as possible evidence that the Times quietly changed the headline to undercut Trump, after the story has been used by the Trump administration as evidence that President Obama ordered Trump's phone lines to be tapped during the election.

The original print headline in the Jan. 20 edition of the New York Times claimed that "wiretapped data" was being used to investigate President Trump's associates. "Wiretapped data used in inquiry of Trump aides," the headline said.

The online version of the accompanying article's headline, however, says, "Intercepted Russian communications part of inquiry into Trump associates."

The online version acknowledges the discrepancy in headlines, which were printed before Trump, without proof, claimed last weekend that former President Obama wiretapped his campaign headquarters before the election.

A spokesperson for the Times told the Washington Examiner after this story published that the online version of the story and the printed version were different from their initial publication and have not been changed.

Obama and intelligence officials have denied Trump's accusation though the White House has pointed to past media reports that said intelligence agencies had spied on Trump's associates.