Salon (because of course) has published an article titled "Fraternities plan to lobby Congress to prevent campus rape investigations." The website's Twitter account called the fraternities a "rape lobby."

The article claims that the lobbying group, FratPAC, is trying to "make it more difficult for colleges and universities to investigate sexual assault allegations."

The inference, of course, is that fraternities are trying to make it easier to rape.

What the Fraternity and Sorority Political Action Committee (note that it represents sororities as well) actually wants is for the American justice system, which has the training and expertise to investigate felonies like rape, to do its job before colleges and universities become caught up in political witch hunts.

FratPAC also wants universities to stop overreacting to accusations of sexual assault by suspending all Greek activity when an accusation comes from a single fraternity — like what happened at the University of Virginia following a now discredited gang-rape allegation.

These are both commonsense requests that, outside of the activist cult and supporting media, are not seen as extreme or crazy positions.

But to Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., who actively refers to one of her constituents as a "rapist" even though he was exonerated by a campus investigation, these requests are "completely backwards."

"We should be making universities more accountable for providing a safe campus, not less," Gillibrand told the Huffington Post. "Waiting for long legal process to play itself out for those victims who pursue criminal charges while leaving potential serial rapists on campus in the interim would put public safety at risk."

Except that locking people up (or kicking them off campus) based solely on an accusation — without any other evidence — flies in the face of due process. What's more, to allow schools to adjudicate campus sexual assault doesn't do real justice for the accusers, either. The most a school can do is expel someone. That, to echo Gillibrand, leaves potential serial rapists wandering the streets, putting public safety at risk. A criminal court can actually take these dangerous people off the streets.

Advocates such as Salon's Jenny Kutner may claim that accusers shouldn't be forced to go to the criminal justice system because it is flawed (while admitting the campus system is flawed as well) make little sense. Kutner seems to suggest that instead of cleaning up the criminal justice system, it is the campus system that needs to be reformed.

This is precisely backwards. Instead of creating an entirely new and flawed system that lacks the training or the incentive to hold a fair hearing, why not work to clean up the system that already has the training and the incentive but lacks the compassion?