Longtime Trump confidant Roger Stone can expect a subpoena from the House Intelligence Committee on Friday if he does not disclose his emissary with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange.

"We'll give it until tomorrow," Rep. Mike Conaway, R-Texas, told CNN on Thursday, adding that he hopes the committee does not need to issue a subpoena.

Stone testified before the House intelligence panel during a closed session in September, where he fielded questions about contacts with the Russian hacker known as Guccifer 2.0 during the 2016 election. Members of the U.S. intelligence community have said they believe Guccifer 2.0 was used by Russian intelligence to propagate stolen emails.

Although Stone claimed during the hearing he did not participate in any collusion with the Russians to interfere with the election, he told reporters afterwards he answered all questions, except he did not disclose the name of his intermediary with Assange.

Stone claimed the exchange with his intermediary was an off-the-record discussion with a journalist and he would not disclose the journalist's identity, although he said he would follow up and ask the journalist if he could unveil the journalist's identity.

"I'm not going to burn somebody I spoke to off the record," Stone said to reporters after the hearing. "If he releases me, if he allows me to release it, I would be happy to give it to the committee. I'm actually going to try to do that."

Conaway said knowing the identity of the intermediary would support Stone's story and eradicate any potential questions.

Stone has said he had no direct contact with Assange and said he learned Assange had obtained Democratic National Committee emails in June via Twitter. He said he contacted the journalist, whom he said had interviewed Assange, to verify the report was true.

Stone attracted scrutiny after he appeared to anticipate WikiLeaks' next document dumps during the 2016 campaign, and even said once Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta's "time in the barrel" would occur soon. However, Stone has dismissed claims he had any prior intel that WikiLeaks would release Podesta's emails. Rather, he said the statement was based off his own investigations of Podesta.