Attorney General Jeff Sessions travels to Miami Wednesday to herald Miami-Dade County's decision to abandon its "sanctuary" practice to shield criminal illegals, and he plans compare their success quelling crime to the Wild West shoot-outs in Chicago, still a sanctuary city.

"Miami-Dade is an example of what is possible through hard work and a rededication to the rule of law. It is proof that the entire nation can do better," Sessions plans to say, according to excerpts of his address provided to Secrets.

"The most fundamental duty of government is to ensure the safety and liberty of its people," he adds.

Sessions has led the legal fight against sanctuary cities in the administration's war on illegal immigration, arguably its biggest success so far. He has promised to pull federal funds for police and jails from cities, notably New York, Chicago and San Francisco, that refuse to cooperate with Homeland Security agencies and turn over criminal illegals.

Miami-Dade changed its policies after President Trump was elected, taking seriously his threat to their federal dollars.

Sessions plans to compare the decision of Miami-Dade to Chicago's stubbornness in sticking with the sanctuary policy backed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, a former top aide to Presidents Bill Clinton and Barack Obama. Emanuel has sued to stop Justice from punishing the city.

"Respect for the rule of law has broken down. In Chicago, their so-called ‘sanctuary policies are just one sad example," say the Sessions excerpts.

"That makes a sanctuary city a trafficker, smuggler, or predator's best friend," he adds.

"I know that Miami-Dade will be an example of the good that comes from following the law. We have already seen that: the same Independence Day weekend when Chicago suffered more than 100 shootings and 15 homicides, Miami-Dade also had a historic number of shooting deaths – zero," says Sessions.

Sessions will be joined at the Port of Miami with Acting Immigration and Customs Enforcement chief Thomas D. Homan.

In a recent interview with Secrets, Homan also knocked Chicago, calling its sanctuary policies dangerous to citizens. "Sanctuary cities, in my opinion, are un-American," he said.

"In the last year, I've read all these stories of how the crime rate has exploded in Chicago, and the president's trying to help them. We're stepping up our game in Chicago. Is Chicago doing everything that it can to decrease the criminal activity up there? I say no," Homan said.

"I say no because if you're an illegal alien, and you get arrested in the United States for a crime, and you get booked in Cook County, Chicago, my officers aren't allowed in the jail. They don't accept our detainers. They don't share information with us," he said.

Homan said that in denying to detain criminals, sanctuary cities end up putting them back on the street where they "will reoffend" and prompt ICE agents to take the dangerous step of tracking them down.

"Why would Cook County not want my officers, federal law enforcement officers, to go talk to somebody who is illegally in the United States that committed yet another crime against the citizens of this country? It's ludicrous," he said.

But, said the one-time Border Patrol agent, "They're a sanctuary city, they're proud of it.

Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com