The U.S. immigrant population has reached a record 41.3 million, according to new U.S. Census Bureau data crunched by a group that advocates for a low immigration rate.

The Center for Immigration Studies said in a report released early Thursday that 2013 census data indicate one in six adults in America is either a legal or illegal immigrant.

The data was taken from the Census Bureau’s American Community Survey. It found that 3.3 million new immigrants arrived in the United States between 2010 and 2013, a number offset by nearly 2 million deaths or cases of immigrants leaving the country.

According to CIS, the census data show that more than 13 percent of the population is now made up of immigrants, the highest percentage in 93 years.

The data also showed that Mexicans are the largest immigrant population, with 11.6 million living in America both legally and illegally. The number of Mexican immigrants, however, has declined by more than 126,000, or 1 percent.

Immigrants from South Asia, East Asia, the Caribbean, the Middle East and sub-Sahara Africa showed the largest increases from 2010 to 2013.

India, for example, is the home country of 254,000 immigrants who came to the United States, a 14 percent increase. Immigrants from China increased by 217,000 or 10 percent. Guatemalan immigrants increased by 71,000 or 9 percent.

The CIS also listed immigration increases by state. Texas topped the list, with an increase of 227,000 immigrants from 2010 to 2013. California ranked second, with about 161,000 new immigrants while Florida ranked third with an increase of 140,000.

Vermont, Montana, Maine, Hawaii and Alabama were the only states who saw a decrease in immigration.

Republicans say poll numbers show more Americans want lower immigration rates.

An August survey by The Polling Company found a majority of likely voters want fewer legal immigrants.

In a June Gallup poll, 41 percent of respondents said they preferred a decrease in U.S. immigration levels, 22 percent said immigration levels should be increased and 33 percent said immigration should remain at the current levels.