The U.S. is considering conducting airstrikes against the Islamic State in the Philippines, according to a report.

NBC News reported Monday the Pentagon may announce Tuesday the authority to strike on ISIS-linked targets that could threaten U.S. allies.

Pentagon spokesperson Capt. Jeff Davis said the U.S. has had a counterterrorism presence in the Philippines for 15 years.

There is currently a small U.S. military presence on the ground supporting the ISIS fight in the southern Philippine city of Marawi.

Hundreds of militants claiming allegiance to ISIS besieged Marawi earlier this summer, aiming to establish an Islamic caliphate in the Philippines.

Filipino government forces have been unable to defeat the militants, after deploying ground troops and bombing the city of 200,000 people with airstrikes.

In Manila on Monday, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson highlighted the ongoing counterterrorism cooperation with the Philippines, a partnership that has continued on despite a much-criticized deadly campaign against drug users led by Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte.

"We're providing them some training and some guidance in terms of how to deal with an enemy that fights in ways that are not like most people have ever had to deal with," Tillerson said.

"I see no conflict at all in our helping them with that situation and our views of other human rights concerns we have with respect to how they carry out their counternarcotics activities."