The Justice Department provided congressional committees with hundreds of text messages between Peter Strzok — the agent on special counsel Robert Mueller’s team who was demoted for critical messages about President Trump — and his alleged mistress Lisa Page, a lawyer also assigned to the probe.

Those text messages were obtained by the Washington Examiner, and show extreme political opinions shared about the two dating back to 2015.

The release comes roughly 12 hours before Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein appears before the House Judiciary Committee to testify about Mueller’s investigation. Rosenstein — who appointed Mueller in May and is the only one with the power to fire him — has praised the investigation thus far, despite calls from Republicans that has become too biased.

One message from Page to Strzok is a link to a story about Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin, with the text “What an utter idiot.”

In November 2015, Page said she hopes House Speaker Paul Ryan “falls and crashes in a blaze of glory,” to which Strzok replied: “Yes, And me too. At some point the Rep party needs to pull their head out of their *ss. Shows no sign of occurring any time soon.”

“Martin O’Malley’s a freak show,” Strzok messaged Page in January 2016, a reference to the former governor of Maryland who ran a brief campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016.

In March 2016, Strzok and Page discuss telling someone who they will vote for in the coming 2016 presidential election.

Strzok texted Page, “I suppose Hillary,” and then moments later, “I would D [Democrat.”

“He doesn’t think you’re an R, does he?” Page asked Strzok, but it is unclear who “he is.

Strzok replied in a series of texts, “He think I wouldn’t vote for her right now. He knows I’m a conservative Dem. But now I wonder.”

Days after the exchange — March 2016 — Page texted Strzok, “God trump is a loathsome human,” to which Strzok replies, “Yet he may win.”

Moments later, Strzok asked whether Trump would be a worse president than Sen. Ted Cruz, to which Page says, “Trump? Yes, I think so.”

The text messages were provided late Tuesday night to the House and Senate Judiciary Committees after multiple requests.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., requested earlier this month the Justice Department provide copies of communications between Strzok and Page.

The communications between the two were part of a broader investigation by the Justice Department’s Offie of Inspector General announced in January 2017 to review allegations that department “policies or procedures were not followed in connection with, or in actions leading up to or related to” former FBI Director Jim Comey’s July 2016 announcement that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton would not be charged in her use of a private email server while secretary of state.

In letters to Goodlatte and Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd wrote the Justice Department expected the documents turned over "to be provided as part of a completed OIG report.”

"However, public reporting about the existence of the text messages prompted Congressional Committee requests for the text messages," Boyd wrote.

Mueller was informed of the text messages on July 27, 2017, Boyd wrote, adding Mueller "immediately concluded that Mr. Strzok could no longer participate in the investigation and he was removed from the team."

In May 2016, when Cruz dropped out of the race, Page told Strzok she thought it was “unbelievable” that it was going to be a Trump-Cruz race.

As the primary heated up in July 2016, Strzok and Page continued unabashed comments about politics ranging from Congress.

As the primary heated up in July 2016, Strzok and Page continue unabashed comments about politics ranging from Congress — “How we make law in this country is offensive and irresponsible,” Page said — to former Attorney General Eric Holder — whose portrait Strzok called “wildly offensive."

On July 14, 2016, Page sent Strzok an article in the New York Times on how Trump’s often controversial rhetoric about race is resonating well with white voters.

“It’s really frightening,” Page sad about the article, later adding, “Yeah, it’s not good.”

During the Republican National Convention, the two goaded each other to flip it on.

“TURN IT ON, TURN IT ON!!! THE DOUCHEBAGS ARE ABOUT TO COME OUT,” Strzok messaged Page on July 19, 2016.

Page replied moments later: "And wow, Donald Trump is an enormous d*uche."

“Hi. How was Trump, other than a douche? Melania?" Strzok replied roughly eight hours later.

“Trump barely spoke, but the first thing out of his mouth was 'we’re going to win sooo big.' The whole thing is like living in a bad dream,” Page replied back.

The two go on to say they hope Trump’s “disorganization comes back to bite him hard in November,” with Strzok saying he feels “Panicked” about the election.

Strzok and Page also traded barbs about other Republican leaders, calling Ben Carson “crazy-ass grain storage pyramid Ben Carson,” Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell “a turtle,” and Ryan “a jerky.”

“This campaign is like watching a train wreck happen over and over again,” Page messaged Strzok on July 21, 2016.

Just a week later, Strzok called Democratic presidential nominee Bernie Sanders supporters “stupid*ass” and “idiots,” to which Page said she “really really” likes former Vice President Joe Biden.

In August 2016, Page sent Strzok an article about Gold Star father Khizr Khan, who famously spoke out against Trump at the Democratic National Convention.

“Jesus. You should read this. And Trump should go f himself,” she said.

Strzok replied, “God that’s a great article. Thanks for sharing. And F Trump.”

Days later, Page asked Strzok to reassure her that “He’s not ever going to become president, right? Right?!”

In mid-August 2016, they continued to question how Trump became the Republican presidential nominee.

“What the hell has happened to our country!?!?!??” Strzok said, days later adding he is “worried about what Trump is encouraging in our behavior.”

On August 26, 2016, Strzok told Page he went to a Walmart in southern Virginia and he could “SMELL the Trump support.…”

Page said she is out to lunch with someone whose name is redacted, and added they both “hate everyone and everything.”

“I want to be there and hate with you, or charm you back to happy,” Strzok replied.

“Just riffing on the hot mess that is our country,” said Page.

In October 2016, Page praised the Obama family: “I’m proud to have had [Barack Obama] as my president.”

The Justice Department provided congressional committees with hundreds of text messages between Peter Strzok — the agent on special counsel Robert Mueller’s team who was demoted for critical messages about President Trump — and his alleged mistress Lisa Page, a lawyer also assigned to the probe.

Those text messages were obtained by the Washington Examiner, and show extreme political opinions shared about the two dating back to 2015.

One message from Page to Strzok is a link to a story about Trump and Russian president Vladimir Putin, with the text “What an utter idiot.”

In Nov. 2015, Page said she hopes House Speaker Paul Ryan “falls and crashes in a blaze of glory,” to which Strzok replied: “Yes, And me too. At some point the Rep party needs to pull their head out of their *ss. Shows no sign of occurring any time soon.”

“Martin O’Malley’s a freak show,” Strzok messaged Page in Jan. 2016, a reference to the former governor of Maryland who ran a brief campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2016.

In March 2016, Strzok and Page discuss telling someone who they will vote for in the coming 2016 presidential election.

Strzok texted Page, “I suppose Hillary,” and then moments later, “I would D [Democrat.”

“He doesn’t think you’re an R, does he?” Page asked Strzok, but it is unclear who "he" is.

Strzok replied in a series of texts, “He think I wouldn’t vote for her right now. He knows I’m a conservative Dem. But now I wonder.”

Days after the exchange — March 2016 — Page texted Strzok, “God trump is a loathsome human,” to which Strzok replies, “Yet he may win.”

Moments later, Strzok asked whether Trump would be a worse president than Sen. Ted Cruz, to which Page says, “Trump? Yes, I think so.”

The text messages were provided late Tuesday night to the House and Senate Judiciary Committees after multiple requests.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte, R-Va., requested earlier this month the Justice Department provide copies of communications between Strzok and Page.

The communications between the two were part of a broader investigation by the Justice Department’s Office of Inspector General announced in Jan. 2017 to review allegations that department “policies or procedures were not followed in connection with, or in actions leading up to or related to” former FBI Director Jim Comey’s July 2016 announcement that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton would not be charged in her use of a private email server while secretary of state.

In letters to Goodlatte and Senate Judiciary Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, Assistant Attorney General Stephen Boyd wrote the Justice Department expected the documents turned over "to be provided as part of a completed OIG report.”

"However, public reporting about the existence of the text messages prompted Congressional Committee requests for the text messages," Boyd wrote.

Mueller was informed of the text messages on July 27, 2017, Boyd wrote, adding Mueller "immediately concluded that Mr. Strzok could no longer participate in the investigation and he was removed from the team."