Defeated Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton conceded Wednesday while dressed in purple, the liturgical color of pain, suffering, royalty and even death.

Her black and purple suit matched the tie wore by her husband, former President Bill Clinton, and others on the New York hotel stage including running mate Sen. Tim Kaine, his wife Anne Holton, and daughter Chelsea.

During her much applauded address, Clinton talked about the pain she felt, quoted scripture, and encouraged her younger supporters to carry on her fight.

According to several religion websites, especially Catholic, the color purple, used during Lent, has many meanings.

The Archdiocese of Boston website said, "The colors violet or purple in Advent help us to remember that we are preparing for the coming of Christ. Lent, the season of penance, repentance, and renewal, also uses the colors violet or purple."

Another religious website said, "Purple represents a period of waiting or preparation in Church history. Priests wear violet chasubles during Advent, a period of between 21 and 28 days before Christmas when Catholics worldwide await the birth of Jesus. Another time of waiting in the Catholic Church occurs during the season of Lent where Roman Catholics prepare and make themselves worthy for the sacrifice of Jesus Christ's death on the cross as the ultimate penance for the sins of humanity. During Lent, Catholics all over the world fast, sacrifice and pray. Priests put on stoles—not chasubles—of violet when administering the Sacrament of Penance when a person receives forgiveness from his or her sins after confessing them privately to a priest. During the Sacrament of Extreme Unction—also called Last Rites—the priest again dons his violet stole while he spiritually prepares a dying person for the afterlife."

And the Christian Resource Institute said, "Purple can symbolize pain, suffering, and therefore mourning and penitence. It is the liturgical color for the Season of Lent."

Exit polls showed that Trump won Catholics, 52 to 45 percent. That was better than President Obama in 2012. he won by a margin of 50 to 48 percent.

Paul Bedard, the Washington Examiner's "Washington Secrets" columnist, can be contacted at pbedard@washingtonexaminer.com