This week, HuffPost, Teen Vogue, and TechCrunch all published competing headlines about how the Trump administration removed a 2014 sexual assault report from the White House website. Teen Vogue mentioned that "this is not the first time the White House has quietly removed important information from its website," and that, "minutes after Trump's inauguration, all mentions of climate change completely disappeared from the site..."

Of course, this would be awful if done maliciously. What these publications aren't reporting is that it's standard practice to archive the old administration's policies and reports –– and that the Obama administration even released a statement on it before it happened.

The idea that President Trump is attempting to hide sexual assault data conveniently fits the narrative. It's not hard to see that he is, in fact, a horrible president in terms of feminism and sexual assault advocacy. But just because he's the first president to coin the abominable phrase "grab her by the pussy" doesn't mean the administration is quietly cleansing their website.

The report, titled "Rape and Sexual Assault: A Renewed Call to Action," was created during the Obama administration. It's chock-full of valuable information, and if it were intentionally censored by Trump and his cronies, that would be a huge problem. But Obama administration files were taken off the current White House site and archived in January. They're still easily accessible online, via ObamaWhiteHouse.gov instead of WhiteHouse.gov. This explains why journalists reported, outraged, that terms such as "climate change" and "LGBT" had been cleaned from the White House website –– removing these documents was likely ​not a malicious move on the part of the Trump administration, but rather a routine practice that happens when administrations transition in the internet age.

Of course, it's worth considering: To what degree do administration officials get wide latitude when they decide which pages to roll over? If they wanted, could they keep certain pages and reports up? It's not unreasonable to assume that President Trump is less concerned with advocacy for victims of sexual assault than his predecessor, given many of his comments. But it's premature to paint archiving reports as a malicious move by a fascist government intent on keeping knowledge away from their citizenry.

Liz Wolfe (@lizzywol) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. She is managing editor at Young Voices.

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