Editorials by both the New York Times and the Washington Post ignore the role President Obama and Democrats played in pushing Obamacare through, which will lead to an average 25 percent spike in insurance premiums under the law next year, and instead are getting ready to blame "politicians" for failing to fix it.

The Department of Health and Human Services announced Monday that 2017 would see an average increase of 25 percent in premium costs for customers who buy insurance off the federal government's insurance "exchanges." The increases contrast with the repeated promises from Obama before the law went into effect that premiums would fall, though Republican critics of the law had repeatedly warned that they would rise.

But editorials published Tuesday night by the Times and the Post did not include Obama's past promise, nor did they say that his signature legislation, one of the top achievements of his domestic agenda, were to fault for the premium spikes.

Obamacare's "flaws are fixable," said the Times, "but only if politicians from both parties work together in good faith."

Similarly, the Post said that "either way, if our politicians are interested in solutions rather than point-scoring, there are fixes [to the law] they can consider."

The White House on Tuesday defended the law, despite its failure to keep premiums down.

"The vast majority of people who are purchasing health insurance through the marketplace will not see a significant increase in the amount that they pay for their healthcare," White House spokesman Josh Earnest claimed. "And that's because the vast majority of people who are purchasing health insurance through the marketplace get tax credits that ensure that healthcare is affordable."