Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., fired back at President-elect Trump calling him the "head clown" of the Democratic Party, saying the name-calling is a cover for Republicans' failure to produce an Obamacare replacement plan.

"I'd say to the president-elect that this is serious, serious stuff – people's health is at stake and people's lives are a stake," Schumer told reporters Thursday.

"I understand that president-elect is in a difficult spot ... instead of calling names, the president-elect should roll up his sleeves and show us a replacement plan that will cover students or post-college students who want to stay on their parents' plan" as well as one that will cover people with pre-existing conditions, Schumer said.

"This is not a time for calling names – it's a time for them to step up to the plate if they want to repeal and show us what they want us to replace it with," he said.

Schumer was responding to a series of Trump tweets early Thursday morning that blamed Democrats for the failures of the Affordable Care Act and argued that they have no desire to fix it. Trump was responding to critical remarks Schumer made Wednesday about Trump and other Republicans' failure to put forward a plan to replace the healthcare law before pledging to repeal it quickly this year.

"The Democrats, lead by head clown Chuck Schumer, know how bad Obamacare is and what a mess they are in," Trump said. "Instead of working to fix it, they do the typical political thing and BLAME," Trump tweeted.

"The fact is Obamacare was a lie from the beginning. 'Keep you (sic) doctor, keep your plan!' It is ... time for Republicans & Democrats to get together and come up with a healthcare plan that really works — much less expensive & FAR BETTER!"

Trump and congressional Republicans have made repealing the Affordable Care Act their first priority for the New Year and Trump's administration. Any repeal would be phased in over two to four years to allow for replacement. While neither Republicans nor Democrats have put forward a concrete plan to replace the law, both sides expressed a desire to keep some of the most popular parts, including prohibiting insurance companies to deny coverage to people with pre-existing conditions and allowing young adults to remain on their parents' insurance plans until the age of 26.