Steve Bannon's interview with Charlie Rose was loaded with new insights into the former White House chief strategist's perspective on the Trump movement.

One less-reported moment in his conversation with Rose, buried at the end of an "overtime" clip from the show posted online only, deserves more attention. As Bannon offered a fervent defense of economic nationalism, he made an interesting prediction about the 2020 presidential election.

The clip begins with Bannon arguing Hillary Clinton is "not very bright" because she doesn't "have a grasp on what's important and what's not."

"Economic nationalism is what this country was built on, the American system, right?" Bannon explained. "We go back to that. We look after our own, we look after our citizens, we look after our manufacturing base, and guess what, this country is going to be greater, more united, more powerful than it's ever been."

"The smart guys of the Democratic Party," he continued, "they understand what's going on, Sherrod Brown gets this, Tim Ryan gets this …"

Bannon contended those Democrats are actively working to "revert" the party's misdirection and "get the identity politics out."

"The only question before us," he told Rose, is whether it is "going to be a left-wing populism or a right-wing populism, and that is the question that will be answered in 2020."

In another clip, Bannon answered his own question, predicting that if Trump delivers on his populist promises, Republicans will make electoral gains in both the House and the Senate in 2018, and the president will win re-election "in a huge landslide" come 2020.

In order to succeed, those "smart guys" of the Democratic Party that Bannon identified face the monumental challenge of pushing to the back burner the progressive base's obsession with race and gender and political correctness. Given that the two highest-ranking leaders at the Democratic National Committee right now are Tom Perez and Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., and there are few moderates among the party's ascendant stars, the other path seems far more likely.

Emily Jashinsky is a commentary writer for the Washington Examiner.